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August 26, 2011

Lots of ground to cover: An update

If you have to discuss a difficult circumstance, I guess Jackson Hole, Wyo., is as nice as place as any to do so. This morning, as most folks know by now, Federal Reserve Chairman Bernanke reiterated the reason that most Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) members support the expectation that policy rates will remain low for the next couple of years:

"In light of its current outlook, the Committee recently decided to provide more specific forward guidance about its expectations for the future path of the federal funds rate. In particular, in the statement following our meeting earlier this month, we indicated that economic conditions—including low rates of resource utilization and a subdued outlook for inflation over the medium run—are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels for the federal funds rate at least through mid-2013. That is, in what the Committee judges to be the most likely scenarios for resource utilization and inflation in the medium term, the target for the federal funds rate would be held at its current low levels for at least two more years."

There are two pieces of information that emphasize the economy's recent weakness and potential slow growth going forward. The first is this week's revised forecasts and potential for gross domestic product (GDP) from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), and the second is today's revision of second quarter GDP from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA). Though estimates of potential GDP have not greatly changed, the CBO's downgrade in forecasts and BEA's report of much lower than potential growth in the second quarter have the current and prospective rates of resource utilization lower than when macroblog covered the issue just about a month ago.

Key to the CBO's estimates is a reasonably good outlook for GDP growth after we get past 2012:

"For the 2013–2016 period, CBO projects that real GDP will grow by an average of 3.6 percent a year, considerably faster than potential output. That growth will bring the economy to a high rate of resource use (that is, completely close the gap between the economy's actual and potential output) by 2017."

The margin for slippage, though, is not great. Assuming that GDP ends 2011 having grown by about 2.3 percent—as projected by the CBO—here's a look at gaps between actual and potential GDP for different, seemingly plausible growth rates:


Attaining 3.5 percent growth by next year moves the CBO's date for closing the output gap up by about a year. On the other hand, a fall in output growth to an average of 3 percent per year moves the date for eliminating resource slack back to 2020. If growth remains below that—well, let's hope it doesn't.

David Altig By Dave Altig, senior vice president and research director at the Atlanta Fed

 

August 26, 2011 in Business Cycles, Economic Growth and Development, Employment, Forecasts, Saving, Capital, and Investment | Permalink

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«economic conditions—including low rates of resource utilization and a subdued outlook for inflation over the medium run—are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels for the federal funds rate at least through mid-2013.»

The exceptionally low funding rates to financial intermediaries are not resulting in equally low rates for customers of those intermediaries, because the Fed has repeatedly hinted that they want to rebuild the balance sheet of the finance sector boosting their profits by granting them a huge spread (and hoping that at least half of those profits go into capital instead of bonuses).

Bernanke's statement then may be interpreted as saying that the Fed does expects the financial sector to need another several years of extra profits resulting from the Fed "subsidy" because the finance sector seem unlikely to be able to make any profit if market conditions prevailed, and indeed it seems that the capital position of many finance sector "national champions" is still weak considering the cosmetically hidden capital losses they have.

As to inflation, wage inflation is indeed well contained (wages are declining in real terms) even if cost of living inflation seems pretty rampant; in a similar country like the UK where indices are less "massaged" the RPI has been running at over 5% and on an increasing trend:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-14538167

Posted by: Blissex | August 26, 2011 at 05:28 PM

Why can't the Federal Reserve tell the public the obvious: Growth will only come about by hiring people with livable wages.

If we don't raise incomes nationally we will be forced to liquidate on a massive scale. It doesn't matter who does the hiring, just that it is done.

It isn't the deficit. It isn't the debt. It's the incomes, stupid.

Posted by: beezer | August 27, 2011 at 06:10 AM

Ken Rogoff says 3-5 years of 1-2% GDP and Carmen Reinhart thinks 5-6 years of 2%. =(

Posted by: DarkLayers | August 27, 2011 at 11:19 PM

In terms of econometrics, annual increment of real GDP per capita is constant over time http://mechonomic.blogspot.com/2011/08/revised-gdp-estimates-support-model-of.html . Therefore, the rate of real GDP per capita growth has to decay as a reciprocal function of the attained level of GDP per capita. The exponential component in the overall GDP is fully related to population growth which has been around 1% per year in the U.S. Currently, the rate of population growth falls and the trajectory of the overall GDP lags behind the projection which includes 1% population growth. If to look at the per head estimates, there is no gap between "potential" and observed levels.
In no case should an economist mix the growth in population and real economic growth.

Posted by: kio | August 28, 2011 at 04:03 AM

It's going to be a long time. Do you know how hard it will be for a person to live in the same town for 30 years?

Our money game will need new rules because 30 years at the same job/house/town is over.

But once that issue is fixed, watch out. Technologically America is so far ahead that earning a 100k(todays $$) salary can be done in 6 months.

To keep the NYC banks from leeching on it will be a task.

Posted by: FormerSSResident | August 31, 2011 at 07:00 PM

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